Why We All Need More Strength

Why We All Need More Strength

Strength is something we all know we need, but finding ways to really work with it can feel complicated if it’s unfamiliar. What do you think of when you think of strength training? I’ve made it my job to show people that strength training shouldn’t be exclusive to sports, but rather it can be used as a healing practice to help maintain our tissues, confidence, control and overall physical health.

From Injury to Inspiration

From Injury to Inspiration

After practicing yoga for almost 20 years, I felt like I was stuck in a box of repetitive patterns and movements. My body complained about the intensity and repetition of my yoga practice with injury after injury, until I was in enough constant pain that I was forced to give up my (beloved, deeply ingrained) yoga practice. That is, until I reached out to Cecily in hopes of discovering how I might once again enjoy movement without the pain to which I'd become accustomed. 

Strength Isn't Something to Fear

Strength Isn't Something to Fear

Walking into a conventional gym for the first, or even third time can be a puzzling experiment. There is always the group of people in the weight room glistening and grunting, a handful of people sticking to the machines, a few seniors making the rounds through different exercises, and maybe a couple newbies like you.

It's Time to Adapt the Way We Teach and Treat ALL Bodies

It's Time to Adapt the Way We Teach and Treat ALL Bodies

We can expect the ripple effects of the growing 65+ population to include a greater demand on health care and hospitals. Never before have therapeutic wellness providers—those who focus on preventative measures as well as rehabilitative treatment (including movement!)—been better positioned to ease the influx of those needing acute care and hospitalization. By educating ourselves NOW about how we can better inform and prepare our parents, aunts, uncles, in-laws and all of their friends, we are taking necessary steps to support those we work with and care about to ensure their “Final Act” is one where pain, frustration and lack of motivation have been replaced with ease, fun and inspiration.  

5 Reasons Why the Detour is Different

5 Reasons Why the Detour is Different

Many teacher training programs revolve around the yoga practice. Yoga Detour takes a different approach whereby the human body, together with its many moving parts, sensations and emotions, is the pivotal centre piece of the training. 

Sitting with Struggle

Sitting with Struggle

The last eleven months of my life have been filled with yoga—yoga practice, yoga training, yoga research and yoga-themed work.  Each day of my immersion in this practice has simultaneously been an overwhelming privilege and an overwhelming struggle. I chose this practice, but have rarely felt like this practice has chosen me back.

Ditch the Hamstring Pain and Never Look Back

Ditch the Hamstring Pain and Never Look Back

If you’ve practiced yoga for any length of time, chances are you have some experience with that nagging pull in the back of your leg—you know the spot, right near the butt—that tells you something’s not quite right with your hamstrings. 

What causes this type of pain?

Why You Don’t Need a Certificate from Yoga Alliance

Why You Don’t Need a Certificate from Yoga Alliance

When we decided to launch Yoga Detour, a teacher training program that integrates extensively-curated information from outside the yoga community into the asana practice, we endeavoured to fuel future instructors with knowledge, critical thinking skills, and the kind of confidence that comes from gaining a thorough education. 

As applications started coming in, we received several inquiries regarding affiliation with Yoga Alliance, a globally recognized “charity” that bestows yoga instructors and teacher training programs with their “Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT)” and “Registered Yoga School (RYS)” designations. On our website it states:

“[W]e have made the decision not to affiliate with Yoga Alliance. It is our belief that the Yoga Alliance organization is far too removed from what is actually happening on the ground, within the yoga community, to have any appreciation or understanding of what it truly means to be a successful, respected instructor.”